Determining the Number of Hydrogen Atoms in a Sample of Pure Ammonia

How can we calculate the number of hydrogen atoms in a 346 g sample of pure ammonia?

What is the first step in determining the number of hydrogen atoms in a sample of pure ammonia?

Answer:

The first step in determining the number of hydrogen atoms in a sample of pure ammonia is to calculate the number of moles of ammonia using its molar mass.

To calculate the number of hydrogen atoms in a 346 g sample of pure ammonia, we first need to find the number of moles of ammonia present in the sample. The molar mass of ammonia (NH3) is approximately 17 g/mol. We can use this information to determine the number of moles of ammonia by dividing the mass of the sample by its molar mass.

Next, we can use the mole ratio between ammonia and hydrogen to determine the number of moles of hydrogen present in the sample. Finally, we can convert the number of moles of hydrogen to the number of hydrogen atoms using Avogadro's number, keeping in mind that there are three hydrogen atoms in one molecule of ammonia.

By following these steps, we can accurately calculate the number of hydrogen atoms in a 346 g sample of pure ammonia. Understanding the calculation process helps us grasp the fundamental principles of chemistry and strengthens our knowledge in the field.

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